Odyssey Bulbs PO Box 382
South Lancaster, MA 01561
800-517-5152
FALL 2017 PRICE LIST
ORDERING GUIDELINES
ORDER A GIFT CERTIFICATE
ODYSSEY PERENNIALS
2017 CATALOG BY GENUS
Page 1
Allium
Anemone
Arisaema
Arum
Camassia
Chionodoxa
Convallaria
Page 2
Colchicum
Page 3
Fall Crocus
Page 4
Spring Crocus
Page 5
Corydalis
Eranthis
Erythronium
Fritillaria
Page 6
Galanthus
Geranium
Gladiolus
Hyacinthoides
Ipheion
Iris
Page 7
Leucojum
Muscari
Narcissus
Nectaroscordum
Ornithogalum
Page 8
Ostrowskia
Polygonatum
Puschkinia
Ranunculus
Scilla
Tulipa
ALLIUM
Ornamental onion

The onion tribe includes hundreds of species, scores of which make good garden plants. Their diminutive to stately stems terminate in dome-shaped to spherical clusters of purple, pink, blue, white, or yellow flowers. The leaves can be grassy or strappy, with some species producing broad, bold, colorful foliage. The flower scapes and leaves arise directly from slender to plump bulbs that carry an idiosyncratic fragrance. Many of the most beautiful ornamental onions are rare in cultivation. Prepare to meet some of them here.

Allium akaka ~ File this under "Cool and Unusual Onions." Long broad glaucous leaves (or sometimes a single leaf) emerge in spring, their curving blades describing a ground-to-ground arch. The 3- to 4-inch domes of dusty-pink flowers are held on stout scapes that barely clear the leaves. This singular plant is exceedingly rare in the trade, as they say. Steppe; E Turkey. Zone 5.
Enter quantity:
1/$14
Allium cupani VV.TD.59 ~ This endearing little onion will raise your spirits when it lifts its perky domes of rather petite, bright lilac-pink blooms on 5-inch stems in July and August. Give it a prominent place in a sunny trough or rock garden, so it can flaunt its cuteness. Mediterranean; SE W Turkey. Zone 6.
Enter quantity:
1/$6
Allium cupuliferum ~ The flowerheads of this beautiful species undergo a fascinating metamorphosis, opening in mid-May as tight, featherduster umbels, which – as the flower pedicels lengthen – gradually transmute into shaggy pale-violet pincushions on 2-foot scapes. Steppe/Montane; C Asia. Zone 5.
Enter quantity:
1/$12
Allium guttatum ssp. dalmaticum AH.9914 ~ The showy, lavender-purple globes of this Antoine Hoog selection make the perfect complement to white-flowered members of the species (one of which we conveniently list below). Sun and decent drainage required. Mediterranean/Modified continental; Montenegro. Zone 5.
Enter quantity:
1/$8
Allium guttatum ssp. sardoum CH.859 ~ Feathery, sweet-scented, chalk-white globes arise on 2-foot stems in midsummer above clumps of coiled, rush-like leaves. The display is as singular as it is striking. Sun and decent drainage required. Mediterranean/Modified continental; N Greece. Zone 5.
Enter quantity:
1/$10
Allium hollandicum ~ Drumstick alliums have been involved in any number of nomenclatural cat-fights. The large, domed, light violet umbels of this taxonomically conflicted species (or hybrid) open atop 3-foot stems in late spring. Our general approach is to enjoy the showy blooms and to leave the botanical wrangling to others. One thing this is NOT is the mass-market cultivar 'Purple Sensation'. Steppe/Montane; C Asia. Zone 5.
Enter quantity:
1/$3
Allium jesdianum 'Pendjikent' ~ Tall, wide, and handsome. Four- to five-foot-tall stems topped with large showy lilac-purple globes arise from rosettes of exceptionally broad strappy leaves in late spring. As with most central Asian onions, 'Pendjikent' does best with full sun and relatively mild summer conditions. Attempts to grow it in the deep South or in damp heavy soil will likely end in misery for the plant and the grower. Steppe/Montane; Tajikistan. Zone 5.
Enter quantity:
1/$5
Allium komarowii ~ Rich violet-purple flowers rise on 14-inch stems above broad, karataviensian leaves in late spring, making for one of the most singular and sought-after onions. Sun and a dryish summer dormancy are a must (we winter and summer it successfully in sharply drained soil). Montane; Tajikistan. Zone 5.
Enter quantity:
1/$8
Allium litwinowii ~ We have a thing for blue alliums, which means we HAD to have this thing, perhaps the most beautiful of the bunch. Dense, violet-tinged, luminous blue domes on relatively compact stems (15 inches) provide a cyanean exclamation point in late spring. As with all the blue onions, sun and good drainage are non-negotiable. Steppe/Montane; Uzbekistan. Zone 5.
Enter quantity:
1/$8
Allium nevskianum~ In the mode of - but in every way superior to - A . karataviense, this rarely offered beauty bears large, short-stemmed umbels of red-purple flowers in May above broad, paired, blue-green basal leaves. A better "doer" than its familiar cousin. Steppe/Montane; Tajikistan. Zone 5.
Enter quantity:
1/$6
Allium oreophilum 'Agalik Giant' ~ A. oreophilum, writ large. In every way – size, intensity of color, form – it far outstrips any of its cultivated kind that have gone before. The showy, deep carmine-rose flowers strut their stuff in June. Montane/Steppe; C Asia. Zone 4.
Enter quantity:
1/$9
Allium ovalifolium ~ Broad-leaved alliums with summer-borne globes of white flowers pop up repeatedly in the floras of the north temperate wooded zones. This one belongs to a group of Eurasian species whose persistent leaves are held on long petioles, in a dead-on impersonation of a hosta. The young foliage is also edible, but you'll probably want to save it for its handsome (and acquaintance-stumping) display. Modified continental; China. Zone 5.
Enter quantity:
1/$12
Allium pendulinum ~ Very close to the alluring A. triquetrum, and like that species favoring partial shade and moist woodsy soil, this beauty differs in that its white, green-midribbed flowers occur in a symmetrical – rather than one-sided – umbel. In our experience it's also far less inclined to spread itself around. Mediterranean; S Central Europe. Zone 6.
Enter quantity:
1/$7.50
Allium protensum ~ Its huge, starburst, sci-fi flowerheads on compact scapes show obvious affinities to the considerably less cold-hardy A. schubertii, but the rarity and unusual coloring of this Central Asian onion give it an added dose of cool. Each umbel comprises numerous light purplish-tan, green tinged blooms that bristle on pedicels of unequal lengths, creating a Sputnik effect. The blue-green leaves are showy in their own right. Ample sun is required, as is well-drained soil in areas not blessed with a steppe climate. Steppe/Montane; C Asia. Zone 5.
Enter quantity:
1/$18
Allium rosenbachianum ~ Here we have the Real McCoy not one of the imposters usually traded under this name. Large (up to 5-inch-wide) globes of luminous, deep violet-purple crown 24- to 30-inch scapes in late May and early June, over broad, bright-green basal leaves which are arresting in their own right (as our photo attests). Zounds. Requires sun and good drainage. Steppe/Montane; Tajikistan. Zone 5.
Enter quantity:
1/$12
Allium shelkovnikovii ~ Its broad dusted gray-green leaves, surmounted in mid-spring by short-scaped domes of pale purple-pink flowers, are reminiscent of a closely related rare beauty, Allium akaka. Only perhaps even a bit more striking. It's new and rare in horticulture. Give it either a porous growing medium or protection from summer moisture. Steppe/Montane; N Iran. Zone 5.
Enter quantity:
1/$20
Allium sibthorpianum ~ A favorite of Allium guru Mark McDonough, this delightful little species sends up numerous heads of nodding lilac-pink bell-flowers in late spring, showing its affinity to the somewhat larger Allium flavum. It's an excellent choice for a rock garden or trough, or other sunny, well-drained niches that could use something with a high cute quotient. Mediterranean/Montane; NW Turkey. Zone 5.
Enter quantity:
1/$13
Allium tricoccum ~ Commonly known as ramps, our native woodland onion is sometimes inadvisably harvested from the wild for its broad, pungently tasty leaves, which have inspired numerous spring festivals as well as a host of haute cuisine dishes. The seedlings offered here would make good eating, but are also well worth growing for the spheres of creamy flowers that appear in early summer after the foliage has withered. They'll form large clumps, where happy. Modified continental/Continental; E & C N America. Zone 4.
Enter quantity:
1/$6
Allium ursinum ~ The European analog to our native wild leek (A. tricoccum), this shade-loving onion is worth growing not only for its heads of white flowers in mid-spring but also for its handsome broad leaves. The leaves and bulbs once figured in the diets of cultures throughout its range. Thus the rash of common names, including bear's garlic and gypsy onion. Modified continental/Maritime/Mediterranean; Europe. Zone 5.
Enter quantity:
1/$5
Allium victorialis ex South Korea ~ With its broad, stalked, convallarian leaves, accompanied in late spring and early summer by clusters of green-tinged white flowers on sturdy 20-inch stems, this farflung Eurasian species is one of the best ornamental (and edible) onions for light shade. Offered here is one of its rarely available East Asian variants, from South Korea. Modified continental/Montane. Zone 5.
Enter quantity:
1/$12
Allium victorialis 'Cantabria' ~ This excellent selection from uplands of northern Spain is relatively robust in all its parts. Modified continental/Montane/Mediterranean; Zone 5.
Enter quantity:
1/$6
Allium 'Stipineva' ~ Combining the dense umbels and ghostly glaucous leaves of Allium nevskianum with some of the altitude of A. stipitatum, this is an outstanding and exciting new hybrid. Huge light purple drumsticks crown 2-foot stems in late spring. Zone 5.
Enter quantity:
1/$15
ANEMONE
Windflower

Windflowers occur in a wide range of guises and habitats throughout the north-temperate zones. "Wood anemones" such as the European A. nemorosa and the American A. quinquefolia make excellent shade-garden subjects, forming networks of stick-like rhizomes that give rise in spring to lobed leaves and dainty white or blue flowers. Less woodsy, more sunny sites are well-suited to tuberous windflowers such as A. blanda, which will self-sow obligingly where happy.

Anemone apennina 'Petrovac' ~ A splendid, robust, rich deep lavender-blue selection of a species that's closely related to the Greek windflower, A. blanda, and like it is ideally suited for massing and naturalizing. The many-petaled flowers appear on 4- to 6-inch stems in April and May above dense foliage. It prefers part-shade and reasonable drainage. Mediterranean/Modified continental; S Europe. Zone 6.
Enter quantity:
1/$6
Anemone blanda 'Enem' ~ Possessing good vigor and large, deep-sky-blue flowers, 'Enem' is also exceptional in its provenance – an outlier population in the northwest Caucasus Mountains, far to the north of the species' main range. Give it light shade and well-drained (but NOT arid) soil. Modified continental/Montane. Zone 5.
Enter quantity:
1/$5
Anemone nemorosa 'Blue Eyes' ~ We have a few rhizomes of what may just be our favorite selection of European wood anemone. The name refers to the fittingly eye-catching azure-blue centers of the double white flowers. We can't get enough of them. Maritime/Modified continental/Continental; Europe to NW Asia. Zone 5. SOLD OUT
1/$10
Anemone nemorosa 'Swedish Pink' ~ The pale rose-pink flowers of this recent introduction give a little foretaste of the fall anemone season. Their reverses are deeper in hue. Growth is somewhat more compact than that of the typical species. Maritime/Modified continental/Continental; Europe to NW Asia. Zone 5.
Enter quantity:
1/$6
Anemone nemorosa 'Vestal' ~ The 'Vestal' version of the double-flowered European wood anemones bears dapper, intricately fashioned, pure-white (what other kind of white would you expect from a vestal version?) pompons in mid-spring. Somehow "pompons" seems at odds with the other imagery going on here, but that's the best we can come up with at this moment. Maritime/Modified continental/Continental; Europe to NW Asia. Zone 5.
Enter quantity:
1/$6
Anemone nemorosa 'Viridescens' ~ All floral parts of this fascinating curiosity have returned to leafhood, forming ferny green ruffs in lieu of blooms. Riveting, in a twisted way. Maritime/Modified continental/Continental; Europe to NW Asia. Zone 5.
Enter quantity:
1/$5

ARISAEMA
Jack in the pulpit; cobra lily
 
Arisaema flavum ~ Its deep lemon-yellow spathes on 16-inch "stems" in June set this gorgeous Himalayan native apart from the common run of jack-in-the-pulpits. Paired, peony-like leaves and orange late-summer fruits complete the picture. Montane/Subtropical; W China. Zone 6.
Enter quantity:
1/$8
Arisaema flavum ssp. tibeticum ~ Larger and showier in bloom than others of the species, this rarely offered eastern-Himalayan native bears bright yellow, erect to arching spathes on strong stems that can reach 18 inches tall. It inhabits dry rocky slopes in the wild and dilikes wet feet (we can identify with that), so give it porous gritty soil. Montane/Subtropical; S China to NE India. Zone 6.
Enter quantity:
1/$12

ARUM
Lords and ladies; cuckoo pint
 
Arum dioscoridis ~ Glossy-green, arrow-shaped leaves in fall and a broad, purple-splotched, apple-green spathe in mid-spring (complete with a barnyard-scented, sooty-black-purple spadix) are among the aroidal charms of this hardy arum. Lots of sun and arid summers are among its preferences. Mediterranean; S Europe. Zone 6.
Enter quantity:
1/$12
Arum elongatum ~ An arum for the fore-border or rock garden, in spring sending up a less-than-stately 8-inch purple spathe that shades to a greenish-white flame at its center (with a velvety purple spadix). The pseudostem doubles in length as the season progresses, in autumn displaying a cob of bright-red fruit. Modified continental; E Europe. Zone 5.
Enter quantity:
1/$12
Arum euxinum ~ A beautiful and singular (and rarely offered) arum, which lifts pale green, wine-stained, slightly hooded spathes above unlobed leaves in early spring, this close relative of A.hygrophilum is also remarkable for its provenance: the Black Sea Coast region of Northern Turkey, an area that hosts some of the best "bulbs" for cold temperate gardens, including Colchicum speciosum and Crocus speciosus. The purplish-tan, fragrance-free spadix is framed by the spathe's white, maroon-edged interior. Typically occurring in moist habitats, A.euxinum is well suited for lightly shaded sites in gardens that are too cold and damp to happily accommodate most other Middle Eastern arums. Modified continental; N Turkey. Zone 5.
Enter quantity:
1/$20
Arum purpureospathum VV.CR.543 ~ Large spathes of an exceptionally deep black-maroon unfurl in late spring over clumps of dark green arrowhead leaves, providing one of the highlights of the aroid season (and making a great accent for Goth gardens). The species is endemic to SW Crete, with only a few populations and a few hundred plants in the wild. Give it gritty soil and full sun. Mediterranean; SW Crete. Zone 6.
Enter quantity:
1/$18
Arum rupicola var. rupicola ~ This stately aroid produces large, smokey-purple spathes and spadices on 2-foot stalks in late spring. Arrow-shaped leaves emerge in late fall. Dislikes summer sogginess, so site accordingly. Steppe/Mediterranean; S Turkey. Zone 6.
Enter quantity:
1/$12

CAMASSIA
Wild hyacinth; quamash
 
Camassia leichtlinii 'Alba' ~ This is one of those nomenclatural oddities – a named white-flowered "selection" of a white-flowered species (the blue-flowered members of the species properly belonging under subspecies suksdorfii.) But it's too lovely a thing to waste time quibbling over. Handsome creamy-white flowers hover in long, open spikes on 3-foot stems in late spring. Steppe/Maritime; NW US. Zone 5.
Enter quantity:
1/$3
Camassia leichtlinii 'Harlequin' ~ This exciting new addition to the camas cultivar clan produces spikes of semi-double white blooms above clumps of cream-edged leaves. Limited availability, as usual. Steppe/Maritime; NW US. Zone 5.
Enter quantity:
1/$16

CHIONODOXA
Glory of the snow
Chionodoxa forbesii 'Blue Mound' ~ Large clusters of rich violet-blue, white-eyed flowers make for one of the showiest and deepest-hued glory-of-the-snow selections we've seen (and it's new to the catalog this year). This cultivar and all that follow are happiest in light shade or sun and humus-rich soil. Mediterranean; W Turkey. Zone 5.
Enter quantity:
1/$3
Chionodoxa forbesii lilac blue ~ We received this vigorous variety under an incorrect name ('Zwanenburg', to be exact) a few years ago, and it's impressed us ever since. The large, pale lavender-blue flowers have recurved segments decorated with sky-blue midstripes. Mediterranean; W Turkey. Zone 5.
Enter quantity:
1/$2
Chionodoxa forbesii 'Valentine' ~ Don't expect February 14 bloom if you live in a latitude such as ours (where we're actually having winter this year, BTW). But you CAN count on a bounty of rich blue blooms that debut a few days earlier than those of most other cultivars. Mediterranean; W Turkey. Zone 5.
Enter quantity:
1/$2
Chionodoxa sardensis ~ The clustered blooms of this charming little snow-glory are a saturated, boraginaceous, October-sky-blue. White anthers accent the flowers' centers. Light shade or sun and well-drained, humus-rich soil are ideal. Mediterranean; W Turkey. Zone 5.
Enter quantity:
1/$2
Chionodoxa sardensis dark form ~ Going the species one-shade-of-blue deeper, this selection is about as cerulean as it gets. Mediterranean; W Turkey. Zone 5.
Enter quantity:
1/$3

CONVALLARIA
Lily of the valley
Convallaria majalis 'Albostriata' ~ One of the most spectacular variegated plants for shade, this heavily cream-striped selection of lily of the valley puts most hostas to shame. It's a slow increaser, behaving more as a clumper than as a vigorous "spreader". Modified continental/Maritime/Montane/Mediterranean; N Temperate Region. Zone 4.
Enter quantity:
1/$15
Convallaria majalis 'Hardwick Hall' ~ Creamy-yellow margins and streaks decorate the blue-green leaves of this elegant but vigorous variegated selection of lily of the valley. Modified continental/Maritime/Montane/Mediterranean; N Temperate Region. Zone 4.
Enter quantity:
1/$8
Convallaria majalis 'Prolificans' ~ "But wait," you say, "lily of the valley is already prolific enough." We have a different kind of proliferation here, however. Each individual bell-flower is multiplied into a dense cluster of smaller, cup-shaped blossoms. From a distance, it reads as a double-flowered form, even though it isn't, botanically speaking. Although moist well-drained soil and semi-shade suit it best, it will adapt to much worse. Modified continental/Maritime/Montane/Mediterranean; N Temperate Region. Zone 4.
Enter quantity:
1/$9
Convallaria majalis var. rosea ~ The usual convallarian swaths of leathery oval leaves give rise in this case to scapes set with fragrant dangling bells of soft purplish pink. Modified continental/Maritime/Montane/Mediterranean; N Temperate Region. Zone 4.
Enter quantity:
1/$4
Convallaria majalis var. transcaucasica ~ Producing relatively long clusters of pink-tinged blooms that are tubbier than those of typical C. majalis, this woodlander from the Caucasus is given full species status by some taxonomists. The leaves are also more rounded than those of standard-issue lily of the valley. It makes a nice change from the usual. Modified continental/Montane; Caucasus. Zone 5.
Enter quantity:
1/$12


top of page

Colchicum   CorydalisFritillaria   Fall Crocus   Spring Crocus   GalanthusIris   LeucojumOrnithogalum  PinelliaTulipa


ODYSSEY BULBS
PO Box 382
South Lancaster, MA  01561
mail@odysseybulbs.com